The purpose of this paper is to take an in depth look at the importance of soft technology to the aeronautical industry in general. This includes Terrestrial Backhaul and the Network of Aeronautical Telecommunications, and Future Aeronautical Mobile Communication Systems.
Terrestrial Backhaul and the Network of Aeronautical Telecommunications

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One very crucial element of soft technology is terrestrial backhaul. Generally speaking, this has been utilized for private networks which are normally operated and owned by service providers such as: single terrestrial radio links, PTT offered ‘services,’ and the network of Aeronautical Telecommunications. At the present time however, in the case of longer range, it is common to utilize VSATs (very small aperture terminals) for oceanic territories or developing (Stacey, n.d).

If the space between the main equipment for a network and the base station is not too far, (for example, a maximum of 2 kilometres), then normally, copper cables in various formats can be employed. In order to command the base station, the latter could reinforce data channel and voice circuits, in addition to overhead signaling. It is simple to carry out E1 transmission along several kilometers without repeats, by employing copper coaxial cables. After this, in order to boost the scope of E1 links over copper cables by 10s of kilometers, repeaters may be utilized.

At the present time, PDH is being seen as an outdated technology, and the newer generation of digital trunking equipment is replacing it. This includes: IP networks that send conventional transmission networks using packets, as well as SDH, DWDM, and ATM. Fiber optic cables are preferable to copper cables, if the connectivity is for a large bandwidth. In the case of private networks, a key feature is being able to control them; that is to say, the ANSP has full control over every aspect of its network (Stacey, n.d).

Future Aeronautical Mobile Communication Systems

In regard to a solution for aeronautical communication technology needs, one soft technology suggestion is a CDMA system. “This… could provide for all expected future voice and data needs for the next few decades. In particular it lends itself well for flexibility, expansion options, the ability to carry multiple and high-capacity data services and voice” (Stacey1, n.d). Various topologies can be achieved, such as TDD and FDD. And when it comes to the importance of software defined radio, at the present time, the majority of waveforms are produced via a digitalized computer chip which is covered with a circuit for filtering. Following the same process, it is important that other soft technology is developed using HF SSB or VHF DSB-A, so that the modulation can be carried out solely with a computer chip, after which it can be sent straight to the last amplification RF stage prior to being transmitted. Alternatively, the procedure of demodulation could be completely carried out within a computer chip. This is a very important aspect of soft technology, as it may be broaden to just using one avionics box which is able to generate various types of modulation (Stacey1, n.d).

In summary, the importance of soft technology to the aeronautical industry in general, cannot be understated. As discussed, the Terrestrial Backhaul and the Network of Aeronautical Telecommunications, and Future Aeronautical Mobile Communication Systems, are fully reliant on such, as while new technology is continually evolving, research and development along with substantial testing takes time. As shown in this paper, there are often various different methods and solutions. Some prove better than others, however, different options are always better for the soft technology engineers, who may need flexibility in what they construct.

    References
  • Stacey, Dale (n.d.). “Terrestrial Backhaul and the Network of Aeronautical Telecommunications.” Aeronautical Radio Communication Systems and Networks. UK: John Wiley & Sons.
  • Stacey1, Dale (n.d.). “ Future Aeronautical Mobile Communication Systems.” Aeronautical Radio Communication Systems and Networks. UK: John Wiley & Sons.