Introduction
Various benefits have been attached to leisure physical activities. These benefits cut across the board for all forks of all the ages. The proponents advise that the activities are important in improving heath statuses and fitness and to avoid adverse health outcomes.

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Berghorn, Forrest J., and Donna E. Schafer. The dynamics of aging: original essays on the processes and experiences of growing old. Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, (1981)44. Print.
The authors propose that leisure activities’ benefits are multi-fold. To the old fork, they say, physical activities may be of extreme importance for persons who have cardiovascular disease. Since the older people are always at a risk of contracting this condition, activities such as walking, cycling and gardening. Activities with lower intensity are preferred to persons who are sedentary as high powered exercises may lead to injury of the tissues. The frequency, intensity and duration of any activity should be the focus in selecting the best activities to stick to for leisure.

Driver, B. L., B. L. Driver, Perry J. Brown, Perry J. Brown, George L. Peterson, and George L. Peterson. Benefits of leisure. State College, Pa.: Venture Pub., (1991)23. Print.
The authors suggest that moderate-intensity-aerobic activity which accrues to approximately two and a half hours a week is good for a starter. The authors further suggest that the chronic diseases will be kept at bay if persons dedicate themselves to physical activities outside their schedule every week.

Fu, Haojian. Physical fitness & activity in the context of leisure education. Hong Kong: Dr. Stephen Hui Research Centre for Physical Research and Wellness, (2001)19. Print.
Hu suggests that physical activities are beneficial to all classes of persons; men and women, children, teens, adults, older adults, people with disabilities and women during pregnancy among other classes. Studies have shown that the benefits range from; prevention of premature death, mental health, prevention of coronary diseases like the high blood pressure and many more. Hu also suggests that many activities are better than one.

Lindner, Erna, and Leah Harpaz. Therapeutic dance/movement: expressive activities for older adults. New York: Human Sciences Press, 1979. Print.
The authors have proposed that the benefits of physical activities far outweigh the possibility of adverse outcomes. They suggest that during and aerobic activity, the muscle move in a rhythmic manner thereby opening and closing cardio vessels. This is a beneficial activity.

Sherwood, Elizabeth A., Robert A. Williams, and Robert E. Rockwell. Science adventures: nature activities for young children. Beltsville, Md.: Gryphon House, (2008)67. Print.
The authors propose that physical activities aid in the cognitive development of the child. The light physical activities undertaken by children help in brain development. They help in developing strong bones, reduce unwanted weight, reduces anxiety and stress and increases self-esteem and many more. The physical activities enhance the educational improvement of the child. Surveys have shown that children that actively participate in physical activities perform better than those that are denied the opportunity. The physical health of young children has a direct impact on their school performance.

Voysey, Katrina. Just what the doctor ordered: the health benefits of taking holidays : ETC research and intelligence. London: Taylor and Francis, (2013)28. Print.
Voysey suggests that physical activities are beneficial to persons with disability. The activities aid in mental health development and physical engagements. He suggests that different physical activities are fit for different persons. What may work for a particular disabled person may not work for the other. It is advisable thus, that a proper activity is diligently selected for a specific person.

    References
  • Andy Ozdemiroglu, E., and J. Newcombe. Collation of valuations of benefits of recreation improvements. Bristol: Environment Agency, 2002. Print.
  • Berghorn, Forrest J., and Donna E. Schafer. The dynamics of aging: original essays on the processes and experiences of growing old. Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, (1981)44. Print.
  • Driver, B. L., B. L. Driver, Perry J. Brown, Perry J. Brown, George L. Peterson, and George L. Peterson. Benefits of leisure. State College, Pa.: Venture Pub., 1991. Print.
  • Fu, Haojian. Physical fitness & activity in the context of leisure education. Hong Kong: Dr. Stephen Hui Research Centre for Physical Research and Wellness, 2001. Print.
  • Lindner, Erna, and Leah Harpaz. Therapeutic dance/movement: expressive activities for older adults. New York: Human Sciences Press, 1979. Print.