The export of the Caribbean cultural identity to the diaspora cab be beneficial to Caribbean islands because it is a form of marketing which increases the representation, awareness, demand for and pride in goods, services and intellectual property which is produced in the Caribbean. This helps the island nations in the Caribbean by ensuring a strong export market that supports employment and local economies.
It is important to note that Caribbean culture is plural, because of the many influences on the development of each country as well as modern manifestation of culture (Holder et al., 2014). This contributes to a richness of cultural identities, but it does make it somewhat harder to promote any unified Caribbean cultural identity. Creolization often refers to a master identity of the various Caribbean nations, however each is unique and the different regions have many variations and differences (khan, 2014).

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The consumption of ancestral culture can also be beneficial by increasing the demand and therefore the value of items produced in the Caribbean islands. Pride in one’s heritage can contribute to seeking out produce and raw goods produced in Caribbean countries, can increase practices which require the consumption of goods from the Caribbean, and increase the popularity of the Caribbean as a destination.

Manufactured goods are not the only commodities which export Caribbean cultural identity. Another good example is sport, particular cricket and soccer (Joseph, 2014). The export of Caribbean sports can increase interest and demand for live sports, whether streaming or on television, as well as for goods which are licensed by the teams and leagues. Further, it contributes to pride in one’s home country by cheering on the team that aligns with one’s heritage.

The export of cultural identity would assist countries in the Caribbean by marketing the culture and the positioning of goods, services and ideas which are developed, manufactured and created there. This would provide economic and social benefits to the people of the Caribbean.

    References
  • Holder, K., Knight, N., Punnett, B. J., & Charles, R. (2014). Culture, leadership and motivation in two Commonwealth Caribbean countries: One look at the African Diaspora. Canadian Journal of Administrative Sciences/Revue Canadienne des Sciences de l’Administration, 31(4), 245-256.
  • Joseph, J. (2014). Culture, community, consciousness: The Caribbean sporting diaspora. International review for the Sociology of Sport, 49(6), 669-687.
  • Khan, A. (2014). Journey to the center of the earth: The Caribbean as master symbol. Cultural Anthropology, 16(3), 271-302.