1. What is the chief acoustic cue for a source feature?The chief acoustic cue for a source feature comes from the presence of what is called phonation energy that will show up as a low frequency voice bar when observed on a spectrogram. The energy of the frication noise is periodic and due to a second sound source will show up as vertical voicing lines on the spectrogram. The energy of the frication noise will fall in voiced fricatives.

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2. What is the chief acoustic cue for a stop next to a vowel?
Vowels have the most energy of all speech sounds so the chief acoustic cue for a stop next to a vowel will show up as a an immediate drop in energy on a spectrogram since vowels show up as the darkest and longest on a spectrogram.

3. What is the chief acoustic cue for a stop in a consonant cluster (not next to a vowel)
The chief acoustic cues for a stop in a consonant cluster are characterized by the silent period during the start of being produced. This shows up as no energy or some kind of a low frequency for a pre-voiced stop. Other cues that are distinctive of a stop manner of production are a quick burst in the release of air, and the rapidness of transitions to and from the stop.

4. What are the chief acoustic cues for a fricative?
The chief acoustic cues for a fricative comes from the duration of the frication noise produced which is extended during its articulation.

5. What are the chief acoustic cues for a vowel?
The chief acoustic cues for a vowel reside in the frequencies of their format. The relationship that exists between F1 and F2 for the acoustic cues of a vowel are very important.