Of the 77 participants, all 77 responded to the questions regarding their mood and their exercise habits. The results indicated that the original hypothesis, such that students who rate themselves as being in a better mood after exercising, was correct.
The results in Table 1 indicate that 2.6% of participants indicated they were 1 (or very sad) thirty minutes before they started exercising. Another 6.5% of participants indicated they were 3 thirty minutes before they started their exercises. The results indicate that a total of 20.8% of participants indicated they were 4 thirty minutes before they started exercising. A total of 29.9% of participants indicated they were 5 thirty minutes before they started exercising. The results indicate that a total of 20.8% of participants indicated they were 6 thirty minutes before they started exercising. A total of 14.3% of participants indicated they were 7 thirty minutes before they started exercising. The results indicate that a total 1.3% of participants indicated they were 8 thirty minutes before they started exercising with another 1.3% of participants indicated they were 9 thirty minutes before they started exercising. And the remaining 2.6% of participants indicated they were 10 (or very happy) thirty minutes before they started exercising. The results all indicate that there exists a higher statistical likelihood that the participants would be less happy thirty minutes before they complete exercises, with very few of the participants rating their mood as above 5, at 40.3% in total indicating a mood anywhere at or above 5.

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The results in Table 2 indicate that 1.3% of participants indicated they were 1 (or very sad) as they were exercising. The results indicate that a total 2.6% of participants indicated they were 2 as they were exercising. A total 7.8% of participants indicated they were 3 as they were exercising. A total of 10.4% of participants indicated they were 4 as they were exercising. The results indicate that a total of 24.7% of participants indicated they were 5 as they were exercising. A total of 11.7% of participants indicated they were 6 as they were exercising. The results indicate that a total of 23.4% of participants indicated they were 7 as they were exercising. A total 6.5% of participants indicated they were 8 as they were exercising with another 9.1% of participants indicated they were 9 as they were exercising. And the remaining 2.6% of participants indicated they were 10 (or very happy) as they were exercising. The results all indicate that there exists a higher statistical likelihood that the participants would be happier while they are completing exercises, with very few of the participants rating their mood as below 5, at 46.8% in total indicating a mood anywhere at or below 5.

The results in Table 3 indicate that 2.6% of participants indicated they were 1 (or very sad) thirty minutes after they stopped exercising. The results indicate that a total 1.3% of participants indicated they were 2 thirty minutes after they stopped exercising. The results indicate that a total 0% of participants indicated they were 3 thirty minutes after they stopped exercising. A total of 0% of participants indicated they were 4 thirty minutes after they stopped exercising. The results indicate that a total of 13.0% of participants indicated they were 5 thirty minutes after they stopped exercising. The results indicate that a total of 14.3% of participants indicated they were 6 thirty minutes after they stopped exercising. A total of 23.4% of participants indicated they were 7 thirty minutes after they stopped exercising. The results indicate that a total 28.6% of participants indicated they were 8 thirty minutes after they stopped exercising with another 9.1% of participants indicated they were 9 thirty minutes after they stopped exercising. And the remaining 7.8% of participants indicated they were 10 (or very happy) thirty minutes after they stopped exercising. The results all indicate that there exists a higher statistical likelihood that the participants would be happier thirty minutes after they complete exercises, with very few of the participants rating their mood as below 5, at 16.9% in total indicating a mood anywhere below 5.

A one way ANOVA was completed for the descriptives of different times of the day that participants exercised (see Table 4). There were 21 total number of participants for exercise in the morning (M = 24.71, SD = 7.01). There were 20 total number of participants for exercise in the afternoon (M = 24.60, SD = 5.35). There were 24 total number of participants for exercise at night (M = 25.33, SD = 4.96). There were 10 total number of participants for those who don’t exercise (M = 22.50, SD = 3.56).

A one way ANOVA was completed for the mood within groups. The results between the groups F(57, 2210) = .613, p = .609 indicated there was a statistical difference between the mood (see Table 5).

The post-hoc tests were completed for the one way ANOVA listed above and the results showed a statistically relevant mean differences (see Table 6).

A one way ANOVA was completed for the descriptives of male versus female participants (see Table 7). There were 25 male participants (M = 25.88, SD = 5.08). There were 51 female participants (M = 24.00, SD = 5.64).

A one way ANOVA was completed for the mood within groups. The results between the groups F(59, 2214) = 1.981, p = .163 indicated there was a statistical difference between the mood (see Table 8).

A one way ANOVA was completed for the descriptives of different types of exercises (see Table 9). There were 14 total number of participants for weight lifting (M = 26.42, SD = 8.26). There were 43 total number of participants for cardio (M = 24.74, SD = 4.93). There were 10 total number of participants for other exercises (M = 23.20, SD = 4.51). There were 9 total number of participants for those who don’t exercise (M = 24.61, SD = 5.50).

A one way ANOVA was completed for the mood between groups. The results between the groups F(3, 72) = 1.416, p = .245 indicated there was a statistical difference between the mood (see Table 10).

The post-hoc tests were completed for the one way ANOVA listed above and the results showed a statistically relevant mean differences (see Table 11).

Discussion
The results discussed above support the statistical improvement to mood that exercise has. Not only does exercise in the middle of the exercise itself improve mood, but up to thirty minutes after completing exercises, the mood will increase even more. The time of day during which participants participated in exercise as well as what kind of was statistically relevant, but not such that it changed the statistical improvement in mood. It was different among men versus women what time of day or what type of exercises were engaged in. This was more reflective upon the demographics of the participants and not on what influence exercise of any kind had on altering and improving mood. Given that the difference in time of day and what exercises were used varied based on male versus female participants, this study revealed that the majority of female participants engaged more in cardiovascular exercises whereas their male counterparts in the experiment engaged in more weight lifting. This was a surprising secondary discovery which establishes itself as a potential place for future studies.

One key limitation here was that a rating scale for mood between one and ten is not necessarily comprehensive. Each of the 77 participants knew that 10 represented “very happy” and 1 represented “very sad” but the individual perception of the ratings that took place in between those two figures may have been vastly different, which could have influenced or skewed the results of this study. It might have been more prudent to affix specific adjectives to each of the numerical representations so as to afford the study a more well rounded set of objectives. In doing this, each of the participants would have been able to agree on the definition for each of the numerical figures. Additionally, certain demographics of the participants were not well represented. There may be key areas of distinction among age groups. One of the key limitations was the time constraints associated with this study. This study was severely limited by time and as such many of the follow up aspects to the tests were not possible. This might also lead to future work.

Future studies can expound upon the age consideration, taking into account wider demographics of participants who are of different ages to verify whether age as a separate consideration or variable plays any significant role in the impact that exercise has on mood. Future studies might expound upon the follow up time afforded, in the form of a more long-term study that might take place over a longer duration of time such as one week, whereby researchers could test beyond thirty minute intervals both before and after the exercise itself and determine how long the exercise influences mood, and whether there are any differences here contingent upon the time of day in which one exercises. While the experiment in this research followed the improvement, if any, exercise had on the mood of the participants, it would be prudent to expound upon the links between make and female participants and the types of exercises in which they each engaged respectively as a future study, one which would expound upon the differences in mood between each exercise type or between each demographic.

The results of this experiment will prove quite useful for academic, professional, and personal use. Academically, these results support the theory that exercise improves mood. It supports the relation between regulated school exercise, or mandated physical therapy classes, and psychological and emotional well-being in tandem with physical well-being. Now schools can incorporate or sustain existing exercise programs using the findings from this report as evidence that the exercise will improve the mood of their students. Professionally the same logic can be applied. Professional organizations struggling with the mood or workplace environment they have cultivated can incorporate gym time, work-sanctioned exercise programs, or other health or fitness classes as part of the company environment. This would be conducive to better moods among staff and increased productivity in the workplace, something which could be based upon the findings of this report. Finally, for personal use, the findings of this report would be best applied to personal situations where individuals are looking to improve their mood. By taking the results, personal moods can be improved with either cardiovascular exercise or weight lifting exercise, at any time of the day and for any duration of time.