A variety of forms of technology have been used to promote the shopping experience and brand identity. In this literature review of RFIDs, several key areas are assessed. From the perspective of a developing business related problems are described to implementing this technology in practical solutions. Through evaluating research reports and media documents on the use of these services by other businesses, it is possible to gain perspective on the usefulness of RFIDs at an item based level to the business on a whole. Further, some focused research questions tailor this initial report to the impact of item based implementation on businesses processes and potential returns. One focus would be defining the idea of why RFIDs can be used effectively in a retail environment. Additionally, research about the benefits to consumers in the shopping processes when assisted by radio frequency technology would be useful in determining its benefits in creating sales. Together, analyses of these specific questions create a targeted analysis of this technology in terms of its scope and value.

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Currently, RFIDs provide a competitive advantage for leading companies in the retail world. Because chains have rolled out this technology in North America’s largest clothing retailers, there are clear indicators that RFID technology will soon be largely accepted by the industry. Further technology can now improve by several orders of magnitude in managing inventory based on the falling costs of the RFID tag (Gorshe, 2012).

RFIDs were discovered in the late 1960s and have been developed under RFID initiatives for retailers, suppliers, manufacturers and technology providers in a variety of fields. Since tags now cost much less per piece than they did several years ago, there are many implications for the changing landscapes in retail as well as the efficiency of cross channel marketing and sales activities. As it has been demonstrated, there are a number of benefits that RFID implementation can have for retail environments. It is projected that by 2015 major retailers and trading brands will utilize these operations and provide source to store benefits that assist both consumers and businesses (Javick, 2011).

Some examples of retailer’s success in this area include American Apparel gaining 99% inventory accuracy and Bloomingdale’s achieving 95% accuracy in Manhattan. Similarly, Gerry Weber carried RFID tags amongst other German fashion retailers because of improvements to speed in delivery and returns. From an executive perspective, suppliers who have implemented RFIDs are not suffering from any type of remorse. There are number of benefits including savings on transportation costs and insight into customers opinions. The biggest obstacle that is held as common wisdom in this space is that retailers and suppliers must find the overall cost of tagging to be effective. Since tag prices have fallen below $.50, it is possible for major suppliers to find them at $.10 in order to profitably target management situations (Gorshe, 2012).

The most beneficial use of RFID tagging involves tracking physical inventory within retail stores. This tracks movement of goods to flow distribution centers and retail environments as well as the source or manufacturing facility. Overall education is much needed in order to adopt greater industry support and standers for the use of RFID’s. One differentiator that is necessary for adoption of the standards while tagging involves electronic product codes are EPC standards. One three-day conference held in Hong Kong elucidated the global language of business and how it would be an opportunity to present best practices for RFID’s. Use of item level RFID tagging is what it will likely help the apparel industry and increase the viability of global supply chains (Javick, 2011).

RFID’s discovered in the late 1960s and have been developed under RFID initiatives for retailers, suppliers, manufacturers and technology providers in a variety of fields. Since tax cost much less per piece is it now than they did several years ago, there are many implications for changing landscapes in retail as well as the efficiency of cross channel marketing and sales activities. As it has been demonstrated their number of benefits that RFID implementation can have for retail environments. It is projected that by 2015 major retailers and trading brands hombres these operations and provide source to store benefits that will benefit both consumers and businesses (Javick, 2011).

One study conducted by a neutral third party organization involved identifying the benefits and areas for improvement with RFID technology. Some findings involved alternatives to large-scale management, how corporate distribution goals can be achieved. Further the study aimed to underscore the benefits and risks of those who adopt these standards. Results from this investigation found that RFID technology can benefit those who choose standards and low cost alternatives in tagging not only within the retail environment but also through corporate responsibilities. It also demonstrated the efficacy of this technology throughout the retail spectrum (Salmon, 2005).

In conclusion, there are a variety of benefits to implementing RFIDs in retail environments including the prospects for sales. There are significant benefits to the retail environment such as increased tracking of physical merchandise. It also allows for increased reporting and efficiency as demonstrated with existing manufacturers. Also, there are a variety of returns that a business can experience from implementing this technology. Since the cost of tagging has significantly decreased, managing stock and watching the flow of inventory are some benefits to business processes on a whole.

    References
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  • Javick, Patrick. (2011). What’s the Future of Item-Level RFID?. Apparel Magazine. Retrieved 11 December 2014 from http://apparel.edgl.com/news/what-s-the-future-of-item-level-rfid-75851
  • Salmon, Kurt. (2005). Moving Forward with Item-Level Radio Frequency Identification in Apparel/Footwear. American Apparel and Footwear Association. Retrieved 11 December 2014 from https://www.wewear.org/assets/1/7/White_Paper-VICS_AAFA_RFID_v11.pdf
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  • Liard, M. (2009). RFID Item-Level Tagging in Fashion Apparel and Footwear. ABIresearch. Retrieved 11 December 2014 from http://www.sensormatic.com/SensormaticGetDoc.aspx?FileID=24304.
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  • Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Item Level Technology for Military Clothing and Individual Equipment (2014). Retrieved 12 December 2014, from https://www.dodmantech.com/ManTechPrograms/Files/DLA/IBIF_RFID_revised_4-6-11.pdf
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